How Effective is The Marie Kondo Method 2019

If it doesn’t spark joy, be gone with it. That’s the Marie Kondo method a now universal technique where the Japanese organization expert teaches people around the world to rid their homes of clutter and thus, rid themselves of the burdens of excess.

Kondo’s best selling book, The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up (published in 2014), motivated people around the world to live more thoughtful, mindful lives by means of purging their homes of the things that do not spark joy.

She introduces the KonMari Method, which focuses on organizing your home by the categories of items as opposed to by specific rooms. The categories are: clothing, books, paper documents, sentimental items, and “Komono,” (miscellaneous). Kondo may be the first ever decluttering celebrity, and she has mainstreamed her method even further with her new Netflix series, Tidying Up with Marie Kondo. 

There are six basic rules to get started:

  1. Commit yourself to tidying up.
  2. Imagine your ideal lifestyle.
  3. Finish discarding first. Before getting rid of items, sincerely thank each item for serving its purpose.
  4. Tidy by category, not location.
  5. Follow the right order.
  6. Ask yourself it it sparks joy.

And five categories to tackle:

  1. Clothes
  2. Books
  3. Papers
  4. Komono (a.k.a. Miscellaneous Items)
  5. Sentimental Items

While many people associate her method with tidying, it’s really about discarding items that lack value. To determine what makes the cut, Kondo has you start by removing everything out of your closets and drawers (category one), all the books off your shelves (category two), all the paperwork out of your desk and bins (you get the idea).

Once you have a big pile, you’re to go item by item and consider if it sparks joy. While Kondo admits that this can feel awkward or unnatural at first, she assures readers and viewers that you’ll get better at recognizing what sparks joy as you go. Once you’ve tossed items in every category, you should have a much smaller set of remaining items that you can return to various closets, drawers, shelves, and boxes. Note that you’re to finish one category before moving onto the next one.

Because you’re actively choosing items that spark joy, and discarding what doesn’t, the intention of the KonMari method is to end up with a clutter-free home that is better able to bring more joy and prosperity to your life. While tidying, she encourages you to visualize the life you want to live to be less stressed, for example and what you need to get there. Anything that won’t help on that journey isn’t deserving of your space or you, she says.

What are the highs?

Sees the value in checking in with yourself as you work through your space. Holding each item in your hands and asking yourself if you need it by tuning into the feeling in your heart is a definite pro.

The simple questioning technique makes a lot of sense. “By simplifying the exercise of decluttering from a series of difficult questions (i.e. Do I need it? Do I use it? Was it expensive?, Is it worth anything?) into one core question: Does it spark joy? Kondo immediately gives you permission to let go of clutter with less guilt and more clarity.

The biggest pro of this method is that it only leaves the good stuff behind, allowing you to live an uncluttered life in which your possessions and surroundings are beautiful, functional, and make you happy. And who wouldn’t want that?

What are the lows?

Though Kondo’s prompt provides a great jumping it probably won’t apply to every item in your space and that’s totally OK. We all have things in our homes that don’t bring us joy but are necessary. For example, my first aid kit. It’s not beautiful, and it’s not joyous, but it’s necessary. If you go too far in the uncluttering, you might do yourself a disservice.

Her method also calls on people to declutter their entire space in one session, which is probably unrealistic for most people. I don’t believe organizing a home can be done in one big swoop for most people. When chronic disorganization and ADD are involved, this can be a very ambitious project, especially done alone.

Most of all, I wish Marie Kondo would just say stop! Stop buying all this stuff. The only solution to our waste crisis is to halt the consumerism clogging our landfills, polluting our oceans and overcrowding our homes. Because what would really spark joy would be a world that isn’t overflowing with garbage

Thanks for reading

See you soon

Ney

key benefits of own less things

I have been in the process to declutter my house lately, is one of my new years resolutions

I have been totally stunned by how much stuff still left that we never utilize.

It every simply continue getting pushed into storage rooms or my office (doesn’t everybody have a signature room where they hide crap when visitors come over?)

I’ve been gradually however without a doubt disposing of the overabundance, and feel myself getting lighter and all the more free with each container that hits the gift heap. I wouldn’t view myself as a  minimalist, yet I’m endeavoring to experience my own adaptation of effortlessness in a way that fits myself in this period of my life.

Today I needed to share a couple of gigantic advantages I’ve found recently in owning less stuff. I trust this can be useful for you in the event that you are searching out some inspiration to pare down your own particular belonging!

1. YOU’LL SPEND LESS

When you settle on the cognizant choice to possess less stuff, you naturally quit searching out new stuff to bring into your home. It’s only guaranteed. Furthermore, by wanting to acquire less stuff, you will spend less also. An enormous advantage!

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2. YOU CAN AFFORD HIGHER QUALITY ITEMS

When you buy less things, you can bear to buy all the more amazing things. Things like quality garments and bedding last any longer than their shoddy partners and is an incredible method to spare yourself cash as time goes on.

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3. YOU’LL HAVE MORE TIME

You’ll be investing less energy cleaning up, sorting out, and keeping up your things. This will abandon you with more opportunity to do the things you really need to do. Sounds quite incredible, correct?

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4. YOU’LL HAVE MORE FREEDOM

You’ll have a feeling of flexibility when you never again feel like your stuff claims you (since let be honest, to a specific degree it does). And furthermore opportunity from contrasting your stuff with what others have. Essentially in light of the fact that you just won’t mind any longer!

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5. YOU’LL STOP LIVING IN THE PAST

Enabling yourself to dispose of the blame or stuff that goes with specific things can be extremely invigorating. Maybe it was a blessing given to you that you were never truly enamored with, or something that you acquired from a relative who passed away. Giving or offering those things doesn’t imply that you didn’t value the idea behind the blessing or that you will overlook that relative. In the event that a thing isn’t serving your present needs or isn’t something you totally adore, it’s alright to dispose of it. You don’t need to feel remorseful or cling to something since you feel committed to.

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6. YOU WILL CHERISH WHAT YOU DO HAVE

I believe it’s just characteristic that when you have less, you acknowledge what you do have significantly more. Will probably appropriately administer to and keep up things like your shoes and garments when you don’t have as quite a bit of it to stress over.

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7. YOU’LL FEEL MORE ENERGIZED

Simply managing so much stuff influences me to feel depleted. It’s freeing not just disposing of things we never again require, yet in addition totally empowering since I never again need to stress or look after those things.

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Thanks for reading

see you soon

Ney

 

Minimalist lifestyle Benefits

“Simplicity, clarity, singleness: These are the attributes that give our lives power and vividness and joy as they are also the marks of great art.” —Richard Holloway

Minimalism can be defined as a style or technique (as in music, literature, or design) that is characterized by extreme spareness and simplicity.

Minimalism in our life is intentionally trying to live with only the things I really need.”

Our world lives at a feverish pace. We are too hurried, too rushed, and too stressed. We work long, passionate hours to pay the bills, but fall deeper into debt. We rush from one activity to another—even multitasking along the way—but never seem to get everything done. We remain in constant connection with others through our cell phones, but true life-changing relationships continue to elude us.

Minimalism slows down life and frees us from this modern hysteria to live faster. It finds freedom to disengage. It seeks to keep only the essentials. It seeks to remove the frivolous and keep the significant. And in doing so, it values the intentional endeavors that add value to life.

Benefits of becoming a minimalist

1. Clarity of mind

We don’t think of our physical possessions being linked to mental and emotional health, but the connection between the two is undeniable.
Studies show when we clear out our closets, it has a massive impact on our mental clarity and peace of mind. Think about it. It makes sense.
That good feeling you get when you take a load of clothes to goodwill or finally go through that junk drawer in your kitchen is backed by research. If you don’t need it, love it or use it, get rid of it.

2. Better health

You might feel hesitant to consider that getting rid of a few physical possession might change your health but consider this: what about clearing the things from your schedule that are unnecessary or unimportant?
Too many of us are over committed in our lives and if we really begin to ask ourselves why we haven’t scaled back already, we’ll find the answer is we’re afraid of disappointing someone—a terrible reason to overload our schedules

Minimalism takes many forms and whether you’re clearing things from your closet, your calendar, or your commitments, your body will thank you.

3. More freedom.

If you really spent some time thinking about it, I bet you would be shocked to think of how many physical possession you own, desire to own, or work hard to own what you don’t even want—all to impress someone at your office, or even in your family.

Dave Ramsey, financial advisor and New York Times bestselling author says:

“We buy things we don’t like with money we don’t have to impress people we don’t like.”

4. Greater purpose.

When you clear out the unnecessary activities and items from your life, something unexpected happens. A clear sense of purpose returns. You feel motivated to do what you’ve set out to do because your direction is clear and there is no confusion. When you only have a few commitments, you can take them seriously.

When you begin to move the focus from possessions to memories, you might not only have more space in your closet, you’ll have enough great memories to keep you smiling for a lifetime. This is the stuff a great life is made of.

See you soon
Thanks for reading

Neylimar